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Elvis’s Graceland Walks the Line Between Private Family Home and Big Business

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Elvis’s Graceland Walks the Line Between Private Family Home and Big Business


The future of the Memphis estate is uncertain in the wake of the death of the legendary musician’s sole heir, his daughter, Lisa Marie Presley.

Since the release of Baz Luhrmann’s Elvis—which won lead actor Austin Butler his first Golden Globe and BAFTA, as well as an Academy Award nomination for best actor—there has been a renewed spotlight on Graceland, the Memphis, Tennessee, estate where the hugely influential musician lived for 20 years until his 1977 death.

Before Graceland was home to the “King of Rock and Roll,” the grounds were part of a 500-acre farm owned by Stephen C. Toof, founder of Memphis’s oldest commercial printing firm. Toof’s daughter, Grace, inherited the property in 1894, and when she died roughly three decades later, the site went to her niece, Memphis socialite Ruth Moore. In 1939, Moore and her husband commissioned local firm Furbringer and Ehrman to build the Colonial Revival–style mansion we know today as Graceland. A 22-year-old Elvis purchased the building and its surrounding 13.8 acres for just north of $100,000 in 1957.

Graceland’s Jungle Room has Polynesian-inspired furniture with carved wood details, faux fur upholstery, and green shag carpet on both the floor and the ceiling.

Graceland’s Jungle Room has Polynesian-inspired furniture with carved wood details, faux fur upholstery, and green shag carpet on both the floor and the…



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